Covering Fridge Dents

You know how it is when you buy a house – the appliances you see are the ones you get. Fair enough. The previous owners had purchased a scratch-and-dent fridge that was marked up on the sides, but the front was intact – presumably to save money. Fair enough. I would have done the same thing. However, when moving the kitchen to a different room, the new fridge location showed off the worst side of the appliance.

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Ouch. That does not look attractive.

Naturally, doing something to cover or fix this ended up on my litany of kitchen projects. After doing some googling, I decided I didn’t want to attempt to 1) pop out the dents (too risky/difficult), 2) re-paint (too hard to match original sheen perfectly), or 3) cover it with a decal (very incongruous for a 1917 time period), and this was about all the internet had to offer me. So, I got creative.

One of my favorite project materials is old frames. You can find some very interesting ones for dirt cheap at second hand places. So, I decided to grab a few old frames and make them into functional scratch-covers. A chalkboard and a corkboard.

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I bought this for the frame, but wanted to give this little piece of art its final day in the sun. My apologies to the nice lady who painted this; I threw away your art and kept the frame.

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The other frame, scrap wood (lightweight – this type of wood is used to make cabinet backing), and a cheap corkboard from Amazon, destined for reuse.

Since these were to hang on the side of the fridge, but I can’t drill holes in my appliances, I had to make these as light as possible. I picked out a light feeling frame, used some thin scrap wood left over from another project, and found a fun new material to try – Contact chalkboard paper.

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This stuff.

Since using Contact paper would be a very low-weight solution, I decided to give it a whirl. Just like any other Contact paper, you just peel off the backing and stick it to its intended host. And that is what I did.

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All the materials, ready for gluing.

After that, I simply used wood glue to attach the frame to the new chalkboard, let it dry, and done!

Assembling the corkboard was much the same. Tip: using a table saw (if you have one) was the fastest and most accurate way of cutting the corkboard to the correct size.

To attach, I used black (to match the fridge) heavy duty Velcro strips. If they ever need to move or come down, I can just peel off the Velcro and use a residue remover to take off the adhesive, with no permanent damage to the fridge.

Do NOT try and use magnets to hold these up. I spent many days trying, failing, and wasting money. Learn from my mistakes!

Here is the final product – to me, it matches the room very nicely and even makes the fridge look a little older/more in keeping with the era. The chalkboard also gives me a cute place to write down our drink selections, and the corkboard a good spot to pin up invites without cluttering the fridge with too many magnets.

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The drawing was done by my artist husband – inspired by an the artwork in an old copy of “Ozma of Oz” that we picked up last weekend. Making homemade sodas is a small hobby of mine, and this is a fun way to show visitors what we have to offer them!

Pro tip: to ‘cure’ a new chalkboard, you need to rub a piece of white chalk all over it, erase it all off, and your board is cured. If it is a new chalkboard surface, it will not look right unless you do this first.

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